Monday, November 21, 2011

School Wind Project

This post is the fourth and final in our series featuring schools across Virginia and their efforts to become more energy efficient. To see parts 1, 2, and 3, click here.

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the School Wind Project is a hands-on initiative that brings wind energy projects into the classroom by providing teachers the opportunity to implement interactive lessons focused on engineering, science and math as well as the necessary lessons for the next generation to learn and solve critical energy issues impacting Virginia. 

Here are some of the VA regions, schools and educational centers participating in the program:

Want to encourage your local school to be more energy efficient or help students learn more about how to save? Find tips and other helpful educational resources by visiting the At School section of the Virginia Energy Sense website here.  Also learn how your school can become a Virginia Energy Sense partner and take the pledge to reduce energy use, today!

Monday, August 8, 2011

Where We Use the Most Power

  • Heating and cooling, typically the largest energy users in homes and businesses
  • Appliances, especially refrigerators, dishwashers and dryers, which together account for about 20% of all energy used in homes
  • Water heating, on average 9 percent of all energy used in the home
  • Lighting, the largest energy user in the commercial sector and 9 percent of power used in homes
  • Electronics, an area where demand is increasing rapidly because of computers, bigger and more high-tech televisions, digital media and appliances

For more information on the biggest sources of electricity demand, visit this page on the Virginia Energy website to read more about energy use in Virginia.

energy efficiency

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Be Smart. Be Cool. BE PAID!

This post was submitted by Adam, from the Arlington Initiative to Reduce Emissions (AIRE).

 IMG00522-20100903-0831 

Dominion Virginia Power rolled out a Smart Cooling Rewards program that single-family residents can take advantage of.

What’s the Smart Cooling Rewards program?  I’m glad you asked.

Dominion will pay you $40 a year to let them install a device that cycles your air-conditioning system off during periods of peak demand.  This is smart grid technology for your air conditioner that is available to Arlington residents in single-family homes.  It benefits our community, the environment, and your wallet 

Sign up today and share this with your neighbors: http://bit.ly/cbywpE 

Read More

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Simple Way to Save on Power Bills

Did you know 30% to 50% of your electricity bill pays for the energy lost through small holes and cracks in your home? This is known as air leakage – and it’s the biggest cause of heating and cooling loss. Cracks are often found around pipes, door frames and electrical outlets.

Fortunately, there are some easy fixes for smaller air leaks that you can seal on your own with products like caulk, spray foam or weather stripping. You can buy any of these products online or at a local store for under ten dollars. With just a little time sealing air leaks, you will cut down on air loss and save money on your monthly energy bill. With a small investment and an hour or so sealing air leaks, you could save hundreds of dollars on your power bill.

Follow us on twitter @VAEnergySense

Friday, April 8, 2011
smarterplanet:

Solar-Powered TV by Samsung Samsung unveils a transparent LCD TV that is solar-powered.
The 46″ prototype TV, shown at CeBit in Germany, includes solar panels that produce energy from the ambient light in a room – because it was engineered to use very little energy, no additional power sources are needed.
Another major breakthrough behind the concept is that the thin screen can display images and information while allowing objects behind it to be visible.

smarterplanet:

Solar-Powered TV by Samsung Samsung unveils a transparent LCD TV that is solar-powered.

The 46″ prototype TV, shown at CeBit in Germany, includes solar panels that produce energy from the ambient light in a room – because it was engineered to use very little energy, no additional power sources are needed.

Another major breakthrough behind the concept is that the thin screen can display images and information while allowing objects behind it to be visible.

Thursday, April 7, 2011 Tuesday, March 29, 2011
smarterplanet:

‘Artificial leaf’ could power a home: MIT scientist

Scientists today claimed one of the milestones in the drive for sustainable energy — development of the first practical “artificial leaf.” Speaking at the 241st National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, they described an advanced solar cell the size of a poker card that mimics photosynthesis.
“A practical artificial leaf has been one of the Holy Grails of science for decades,” said MIT chemist Daniel Nocera, Ph.D., who led the research team. “We believe we have done it. The artificial leaf shows particular promise as an inexpensive source of electricity for homes of the poor in developing countries. Our goal is to make each home its own power station,” he said. “One can envision villages in India and Africa not long from now purchasing an affordable basic power system based on this technology.”
The device is made from silicon, electronics and catalysts. Placed in a single gallon of water in a bright sunlight, the device could produce enough electricity to supply a house in a developing country with electricity for a day, Nocera said. It does so by splitting water into its two components, hydrogen and oxygen.
The hydrogen and oxygen gases would be stored in a fuel cell, which uses those two materials to produce electricity, located either on top of the house or beside it.
Source: Kurzweil AI

smarterplanet:

‘Artificial leaf’ could power a home: MIT scientist

Scientists today claimed one of the milestones in the drive for sustainable energy — development of the first practical “artificial leaf.” Speaking at the 241st National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, they described an advanced solar cell the size of a poker card that mimics photosynthesis.

“A practical artificial leaf has been one of the Holy Grails of science for decades,” said MIT chemist Daniel Nocera, Ph.D., who led the research team. “We believe we have done it. The artificial leaf shows particular promise as an inexpensive source of electricity for homes of the poor in developing countries. Our goal is to make each home its own power station,” he said. “One can envision villages in India and Africa not long from now purchasing an affordable basic power system based on this technology.”

The device is made from silicon, electronics and catalysts. Placed in a single gallon of water in a bright sunlight, the device could produce enough electricity to supply a house in a developing country with electricity for a day, Nocera said. It does so by splitting water into its two components, hydrogen and oxygen.

The hydrogen and oxygen gases would be stored in a fuel cell, which uses those two materials to produce electricity, located either on top of the house or beside it.

Source: Kurzweil AI

Friday, March 4, 2011

The eBay Box - eBay Green Team

This reusable box is a great way to cut down on wasting resources. And it’s got a cool design too! According to Ebay:
"… if every box gets reused at least five times, we could protect nearly 4,000 trees, save 2.4 million gallons of water and conserve enough energy to power 49 homes for a year. We’ve also left plenty of space on the boxes for you – and everyone else who receives the box – to write a personal message to the next person in the chain, giving every box a life of its very own. The history of each box can also be tracked through a virtual community where buyers and sellers can connect online.”
Awesome!

The eBay Box - eBay Green Team

This reusable box is a great way to cut down on wasting resources. And it’s got a cool design too! According to Ebay:

"… if every box gets reused at least five times, we could protect nearly 4,000 trees, save 2.4 million gallons of water and conserve enough energy to power 49 homes for a year. We’ve also left plenty of space on the boxes for you – and everyone else who receives the box – to write a personal message to the next person in the chain, giving every box a life of its very own. The history of each box can also be tracked through a virtual community where buyers and sellers can connect online.”

Awesome!

Thursday, February 3, 2011 Wednesday, February 2, 2011